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December 2015

How to Root Samsung Galaxy J7 with a few clicks

How To Install TWRP Recovery & Root Samsung Galaxy J7

Samsung Galaxy J7 is a high quality Android smartphone, which comes with 5.5 inch super AMOLED touchscreen display powered by 1.5 GHz octa-core processor along with a 1.5 GB RAM and the device runs on Android 5.1 Lollipop operating system. If you have purchased this smartphone and looking for a way to gain root privileges, you are in the right page as I have given a tutorial to root Samsung Galaxy J7 here.
Along with rooting tutorial, I have also provided a tutorial for installing TWRP recovery in Galaxy J7 using Odin. The advantages of gaining root privileges is that it will let you to install custom-built Android applications which only runs on rooted devices, custom ROM firmware’s, etc.

WARNING: Rooting your Samsung smartphone will void its warranty and you won’t be able to claim it back until you unroot your device. Also, if your device gets damaged during the rooting procedure, don’t held me responsible. Proceed with CAUTION.

Install TWRP Recovey And Root Samsung Galaxy J7

Prerequisites:

1) Before getting started with a rooting procedure, it is always important to take a complete backup of personal data in your smartphone. So take a complete backup using Samsung Kies.
2) Next, you will need to enable USB debugging mode in your smartphone by following this path: Settings -> Developer Options -> USB Debugging.
Enable USB Debugging In Galaxy J7
If you can’t see the Developer options in your Settings, then you will need to enable it by following this path: Settings -> About Phone -> Build Number (tap on it for 7 times to enable Developer Mode). Also, if you are using the Indian version of Samsung Galaxy J7, you will need to enable OEM Unlock by following this path: Settings -> Developer Options -> Enable OEM Unlock.
Enable OEM Unlock Samsung Galaxy J7
3) Now, download Samsung Galaxy J7 USB driver and install it in your computer. Only by doing so, you will be able to connect your smartphone with the computer.
4) Make sure that your device has at least 50-60% battery backup in it before getting started with the rooting procedure.
Once you have finished all these prerequisites, you can follow the tutorials given below.

Tutorial To Install TWRP Recovery In Samsung Galaxy J7:

1) To get started, download Odin package and extract it to a folder in your computer. Next, download TWRP recovery for Samsung Galaxy J7

and save it in your computer as well. Once done, launch the Odin3 window.
2) Now, switch off your Galaxy J7 smartphone and boot it into the bootloader mode by pressing and holding the Volume Up, Home and Power buttons simultaneously for few seconds.
Download Bootloader Mode Samsung Smartphone
3) Once your Samsung device boots into the Bootloader or Download mode, connect it with the computer using the original USB data cable. If you have installed the USB drivers of your device properly, then you will see the “Added” message in the Log box of Odin.

Odin3 Added Message
4) Now, click on the AP button in Odin and select the “twrp-2.8.7.0-j7elte.tar” file from the folder where you have TWRP recovery extracted files.
Odin3 AP Button
5) Next, make sure that the “Auto Reboot” and “F. Reset Time” boxes are ticked in Odin. Also ensure that the “Re-Partition” option is not enabled. Once everything is in place, click the “Start” button in Odin to begin the flashing process.
6) If you have done everything properly as per the instructions given here, TWRP recovery will get flashed in your device. Once the flashing process is over, it will automatically reboot. Also, you will get the “PASS” message in Odin as shown in the screenshot below.
Odin3 Pass Message
That’s it. Now you have successfully finished flashing TWRP recovery in Samsung Galaxy J7 smartphone. Let’s find out the way to root this smartphone.

Tutorial To Root Samsung Galaxy J7:

1) To get started, download SuperSU zip package to your computer. Next, connect your smartphone to the computer using the original USB data cable and transfer the SuperSU file to your device’s internal memory. Once done, unplug your smartphone from the computer.
2) Now, switch off your smartphone and boot it into the TWRP recovery mode by pressing the Volume Down, Home and Power buttons simultaneously for few seconds.
Recovery Mode Samsung Galaxy J7
3) Once your device boots into the TWRP recovery mode, flash the SuperSU package by following this path: Install -> Select Zip To Install (select the SuperSU zip package).
TWRP Recovery Screen Moto E
4) Once the flashing process gets finished, click on “Reboot System” to finish the rooting process.
TWRP Recovery Reboot System
That’s it. Now you have successfully finished rooting Samsung Galaxy J7. For confirmation, open up your Apps Menu and look for the SuperSU app. If it is located there, then you have completed the rooting procedure successfully. Alternatively, you can confirm the root privileges of your smartphone by using the Root Checker app (available in Google Play Store).
Samsung Galaxy J7 Root Access Is Available
If you encounter any issues while following this procedure, do let me know via comments.

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Bash Useful Tricks

Source: – bash-shortcuts-for-maximum-productivity
Really useful article. Practice until you remember these little tricks. This article will save you a lot of time

Sharing this article on the blog, so that readers can get best tips at one location.

Command Editing Shortcuts

  • Ctrl + a – go to the start of the command line
  • Ctrl + e – go to the end of the command line
  • Ctrl + k – delete from cursor to the end of the command line
  • Ctrl + u – delete from cursor to the start of the command line
  • Ctrl + w – delete from cursor to start of word (i.e. delete backwards one word)
  • Ctrl + y – paste word or text that was cut using one of the deletion shortcuts (such as the one above) after the cursor
  • Ctrl + xx – move between start of command line and current cursor position (and back again)
  • Alt + b – move backward one word (or go to start of word the cursor is currently on)
  • Alt + f – move forward one word (or go to end of word the cursor is currently on)
  • Alt + d – delete to end of word starting at cursor (whole word if cursor is at the beginning of word)
  • Alt + c – capitalize to end of word starting at cursor (whole word if cursor is at the beginning of word)
  • Alt + u – make uppercase from cursor to end of word
  • Alt + l – make lowercase from cursor to end of word
  • Alt + t – swap current word with previous
  • Ctrl + f – move forward one character
  • Ctrl + b – move backward one character
  • Ctrl + d – delete character under the cursor
  • Ctrl + h – delete character before the cursor
  • Ctrl + t – swap character under cursor with the previous one

Command Recall Shortcuts

  • Ctrl + r – search the history backwards
  • Ctrl + g – escape from history searching mode
  • Ctrl + p – previous command in history (i.e. walk back through the command history)
  • Ctrl + n – next command in history (i.e. walk forward through the command history)
  • Alt + . – use the last word of the previous command

Command Control Shortcuts

  • Ctrl + l – clear the screen
  • Ctrl + s – stops the output to the screen (for long running verbose command)
  • Ctrl + q – allow output to the screen (if previously stopped using command above)
  • Ctrl + c – terminate the command
  • Ctrl + z – suspend/stop the command

Bash Bang (!) Commands

Bash also has some handy features that use the ! (bang) to allow you to do some funky stuff with bash commands.

  • !! – run last command
  • !blah – run the most recent command that starts with ‘blah’ (e.g. !ls)
  • !blah:p – print out the command that !blah would run (also adds it as the latest command in the command history)
  • !$ – the last word of the previous command (same as Alt + .)
  • !$:p – print out the word that !$ would substitute
  • !* – the previous command except for the last word (e.g. if you type ‘find some_file.txt /‘, then !* would give you ‘find some_file.txt‘)
  • !*:p – print out what !* would substitute

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